NanoPlus High Performance with Extended Range

Principle of Zeta Potential Measurement

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In most cases, colloidal particles possess a positive or negative electrostatic charge. As electrical fields are applied to the particle dispersion, the particles migrate in oppositely charged directions. As particles are irradiated in migration, scattering light causes Doppler shift depending on electrophoresis mobility. NanoPlus software calculates the amount of Doppler shift followed by electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential by combining a heterodyne system and photon correlation method to perform Fourier transform (FFT) Slipping level Major part of medium of obtained correlation function.

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Zeta Potential Measurement Features of the NanoPlus-2 and NanoPlus-3 

  • Measures zeta-potential of a sample suspension in the range of -500 mV to +500 mV with concentrations from 0.001% to 40%
  • Reliable measurements based on electrophoretic light scattering technology conforms to ISO 13099-2
  • Accurately measures both dilute and concentrated suspensions
  • Capable of evaluating the surface charge on solid surfaces, film, etc. based on electroosmotic probing
  • Variety of sample cells available

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The NanoPlus is capable of obtaining high resolution zeta potential analyses even with multi-component samples. In the examle on the right, a mixture of five polystyrene latexes of different particle sizes was measured. Five spectrums corresponding to each lotex component was detected. The zeta potential of these components were in the range of -45mV to -107 mV

 

 

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Evaluation of Dispersion Stability by Zeta Potential/Particle Size

As the absolute value of zeta potential is larger, many colloidal particles show good dispersability as the electrostatic repulsion becomes stronger. However, as the zeta potential registers close to zero, the particles become unstable and are likely to aggregate

 

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